18.4.17

Lithuania


The Lithuanian team that was defeated 3-2 by Latvia at Kaunas on 21st August 1926.



16.4.17

Leagues

Nottingham Evening Post 24.09.89

In the same way in which the FA Cup spawned many imitators, the foundation of the Football League gave rise to the establishment of any number of similar organizations. 
As the above cutting shows, these developments didn't take long to trickle down to 'grass roots' level. 

12.4.17

Wednesday v Middlesbrough



A lovely old programme from 1902.
Hogg played in place of Blacketh.
Featured in the Wednesday line up were 2 beautifully named players, Ambrose Langley and Herod Ruddlesdin.
Wednesday won 2-0, Davis and Wilson the scorers.
Attendance at Owlerton was 20,000.

9.4.17

The Sixty Minute International Match


Played at The Oval, 18.01.79.
England 2 Wales 1


England
Wales
Rupert Anderson
Old Etonians
George Glascodine
Wrexham
Lindsay Bury
Cambridge University
Llewelyn Kenrick
Oswestry
Claud Wilson
Oxford University
G.G Higham
Oswestry
Norman Bailey
Clapham Rovers
William Williams
Druids
W.E Clegg
Sheffield Albion
Thomas Owen
Oswestry
Edward Parry
Old Carthusians
William Henry Davies
Oswestry
Heathcote Sorby
Thursday Wanderers
William Shone
Oswestry
Arthur Cursham
Notts County
Dennis Heywood
Druids
Henry Wace
Wanderers
John Price
Wrexham
Herbert Whitfield
Old Etonians
Digby Owen
Oswestry
Billy Mosforth
Sheffield Albion
William Roberts
Llangollen


After playing Scotland 3 times (3 defeats and 15 unanswered goals), Wales were offered a match against England at The Oval in January 1879.
The weather was appalling but Wales , after so much anticipation, were particularly keen for the game to go ahead, There were no more than 300 spectators present (maybe as few as 85).
A thick layer of snow covered the ground and it was agreed to play a truncated match of 30 minutes each way.

This gave rise to 3 players having England careers that lasted just one hour despite not being injured or substituted. Neither of England's debutant scorers (Whitfield and Sorby) was selected again, and it is worth noting that 19 year old Rupert Anderson was a forward who went in goal when Remnant FC's Rev. W. Blackmore  failed  to turn up (on the only occasion he was selected for England).
Contrary to some speculative sources Thomas Owen of Oswestry was almost certainly not the father of the poet Wilfred Owen. Wilfred Owen's father was born in Nantwich (England) on 31st  May 1862.

6.4.17

... a less rough and dangerous game ...


Bath Chronicle and Weekly Gazette 19.10.71


John Charles Thring was instrumental in developing two sets of rules during the pre-history of football.
 The Cambridge Rules of 1848 were an attempt at a compromise / unified code based on the games played at Eton, Harrow, Rugby, Winchester, and Thring's old school, Shrewsbury.
In 1862 Thring was a master at Uppingham School when he developed 'The Simplest Game' (also known as  'The Uppingham Rules').
These rules had some influence on the Football Association when they began formulating the Laws of the Game in 1863.
Of course, whilst giving us the greatest and most popular game in the world, the Football Association ultimately failed in their goal of unifying football.
Debates as to the relative merits, safety and propriety of football and Rugby feature widely in newspaper correspondence in the 19th century.
Thring's appeal here went unheeded, and the west of England became something of a Rugby stronghold. 


3.4.17

Alcock on Lancashire

Though the introduction of Association football into Lancashire about the same period as the establishment of the Cup, the first of an innumerable succession of trophies of a similar kind, was a mere coincidence and in no way connected, it is curious, considering the conspicuous part Lancashire clubs have played in the competition of late years, that their origin should have been coeval The paternity of the Association game in Lancashire may be claimed by Mr. J. C. Kay, an old Harrovian, who subsequently made himself a reputation in another branch of sport, as a lawn tennis player of no small ability, as well as manager of perhaps the best organized lawn tennis meeting in the kingdom" that which takes place annually on the ground of the Liverpool Cricket Club. Educated at Harrow, it was only natural that the primitive game in use in Lancashire should have been based very much on the eccentric admixture of different codes to which young Harrow had been used for generation after generation. The introduction of the Association game into Lancashire was, in fact, in a very great measure the work of an old Harrovian, as, some twenty years before, the initiation of the movement which practically led to the revival of football on a proper basis was to a considerable extent the work of a few keen athletes who had graduated at his School. To East Lancashire, in particular, belongs the credit of fostering the game in its infancy, as well as of assisting in the development which has resulted in making Lancashire one of the most powerful influences in Association football Bolton, I believe, was the first place which took at all kindly to the new sport, and, under Mr. Kay's watchful eye, the Harrow game, or perhaps as near a reproduction as could be devised to suit local requirements, for a time supplied all the wants of the lads who were undergoing their novitiate in football. Practice took place in the evenings, and, in fact, the game was of a very primitive kind, followed after the hard work of the day had been completed. It was not long, though, before an attempt was made to evolve something like system out of the rough efforts of these pioneers of Lancashire football. The first result of this organization, I have reason to believe, was the Bolton Wanderers club, which has outlived the many, and some of them excellent, changes through which football has gone during the last quarter of a century, and still remains a power in the land; in fact, one of the most influential combinations of the same kind in the north of England.


C.W Alcock  Football: The Association Game  (1906) 



Bolton Wanderers

C.W Alcock is correct in that it was John Charles Kay, along with his brother, who took the Harrow game to Lancashire, but it was first played at Turton, rather than Bolton.

Mr Alcock  overlooks the 'first wave' of Lancashire clubs (Turton, Darwen) who sowed the seeds that produced illustrious clubs such as Blackburn Rovers (f.1875).
Bolton Wanderers came into being in 1877, evolving from  Christ Church F.C (f.1874).


1.4.17

A.J Woolley & Co.


21 rue de la Pépinière, 75008 Paris is still home to a sports shop!

30.3.17

Nita Carmona




Apparently Ana Carmona Ruiz, known as Nita Carmona, played for Sporting Club Malaga in the 1920s in the guise of a man.



29.3.17

Yacopini


Brothers Bruno and Gino Jacoponi, a goalkeeper and a forward respectively, played for Livorno  in the Prima Categoria final of 1920.


US Livorno 1920.

In 1923 the brothers moved to Chile where they joined Audax Club Sportivo Italiano.
Audax won the Copa Ismael Pereira Íñiguez in 1924.
Gino Jacoponi was still playing for Audax in 1933, the year of the first Chilean national championships. 


28.3.17

The Wanderers' Last Match

December 18th, 1883. Kennington Oval. The great Wanderers, the dominant force in early Association football, 5 time FA Cup winners, play their last ever game, the annual match with Harrow School.



27.3.17

The club named after a ship...



Hertha was a steamship that cruised the Havel River. It so impressed young Fritz Lindner that when he formed a football club in 1892 he took not only the name of the ship, but also its blue and white livery. 

Berliner Fußball-Club Hertha 92 was founded on 25.07.92 by Fritz and his brother Max and the Lorenz brothers, Otto and Willi. These were 16-17 year old youths.
In 1900 the club were founder members of the Deutscher Fußball-Bund .

26.3.17

Segar Bastard


In the 19th century officials (umpires and referees as they were until 1891) were often drawn from among the ranks of the players.
Segar Bastard of Upton Park refereed the 1878 FA Cup Final at the age of 24.
Mr Bastard had the distinction of refereeing an international match before playing in one.

He took charge of the 60 minute match between England and Wales at a snowy Oval in January 1879.
In March 1880 he made his sole international appearance as a player, playing wide on the right in a 5-4 defeat in Glasgow.
Two days later he umpired in the Wales v England match at Wrexham.

In 1881 Mr Bastard oversaw Wales' shock 1-0 over England at Blackburn (again in the snow).

In 1882 he acted as Umpire in England's games with Scotland (a 5-1 defeat) and Wales (a 5-3 defeat).

As a player his greatest successes came in 1882-83 & 1883-84, winning the London Senior Cup with Upton Park. 


22.3.17

La Máquina Blanca


Nacional won back to back championships in 1933 & 1934, the team nicknamed La Máquina Blanca.
The 1933 championship concluded (almost) in the notorious  El gol de la valija  incident 
The record of the 2 Championship seasons was:


P
W
D
L
F
A
27
20
6
1
56
10
27
17
7
3
51
17



Américo Szigeti of Hungary became head coach during the 1933 season.
The players who contributed to La Máquina Blanca were:


GK
Eduardo García

FB
José Nasazzi  
Ulises Chifflet
Domingos da Guia (Brazil)
Juan Brito
Juan Ramón Cabrera

HB
Arsenio Fernández
Ricardo Faccio
               Marcelino Pérez
               Michele Andreolo (Italy)
               Fausto dos Santos (Brazil)
               Conduelo Píriz

F             Juan Miguel Labraga
               Aníbal Ciocca
               Rodolpho Barteczko Patesko (Brazil)
               Pedro Cea
               Pedro Petrone
               Zoilo Saldombide
               Santos Urdinarán
               Francisco Arispe
               Pedro Duhart (France)
               Héctor Castro
               Enrique Fernández
               Eduardo Ithurbide




19.3.17

феникс

Phoenix were active in the Moscow area in the years leading up to the war with the Central Powers (1914).
Based at Zuyevo, Phoenix played in the Orekhovo-Zuyevo league. 



17.3.17

Sheffield Wednesday At The Seaside


The seaside preparation paid off as Wednesday beat Grimsby Town 5-1 at Owlerton on 16th January, David McLean scoring 4.
The clubs official name was The Wednesday Football Club up until 1929, but the press often referred to them as Sheffield Wednesday.






15.3.17

Foot Ball Club Bergamo


Foot Ball Club Bergamo was founded by Swiss residents of the city in 1903-04.
They participated in the Lombardy championships up until 1910, but were eclipsed by their neighbours Atalanta Bergamasca Calcio (founded 1907).



11.3.17

London FA Senior Cup

The London FA was established in 1882, effectively as a branch of the actual Football Association with the purpose of overseeing club football in the metropolitan area. This was to enable the FA to focus on administering the Laws of the Game, the FA Cup  and international football. Any clubs within 12 miles of Charing Cross fall under the jurisdiction of the London  Association.
The following clubs were members in the inaugural season:

Acton
Hermits
Olympic
Vulcans
Alexandra
Hotspur
Olympic Rangers
West End
Alpine Rovers
Kildare
Park
Westminster Club
Argus
Lennox
Pilgrims
Woodford Bridge
Clapham Rovers
Lyonstown
Prairie Rangers

Clapton
Melrose
Rangers
City Ramblers
Minerva
St Alban’s
Dreadnought
Morton Rangers
St Bartholomew’s Hospital
Excelsior
Mosquitoes
St Bride’s
Finchley
Oakshott
St Peter’s
Grove House
Old Brightonians
Somerset
Hanover
Old Etonians
Union
Hatton Rovers
Old Westminsters
Upton Park
Hendon
Olympian
Upton Rangers





The first President was A.F Kinnaird, Vice presidents were C.W Alcock and R.A Ogilvie. Hon. sec. was N. L Jackson (founder of Corinthian F.C, who eschewed 'competitive' football). London followed the example of provincial associations and instituted a cup competition for member clubs.
Southern Football was essentially amateur up until the 1890s (Royal Arsenal and Brentford  are the only teams featured here to play League football until Wimbledon and Barnet graduated to the League in the 1970s and 1990s).
The early years of the competition were dominated by venerable amateur clubs that regularly saw players capped by  England.
Old Carthusians had won the FA Cup in 1880-81 and were semi-finalists in the following 2 seasons.  Their wins in  1894 and 1897 were 'doubles' in which they also won the FA Amateur Cup.




                                                                         Clapton 1889

1882-83 
Upton Park
4
0
Old Foresters
1883-84
Upton Park
4
1
Old Foresters
1884-85
Old Foresters
2
1
Upton Park
1885-86
Ashburnham Rovers
2
1
Hotspur
1886-87
Old Westminsters
1
1
Casuals
Shared
1887-88
Old Westminsters
1
0
Casuals
1888-89
Clapton
4
2
Casuals
1889-90
Old Westminsters
1
0
Royal Arsenal
1890-91
Royal Arsenal
6
0
St Bartholomew’s Hospital
1891-92
Old Westminsters
2
1
Ilford
1892-93
Old Westminsters
3
0
Casuals
1893-94
Old Foresters
2
1
Old Carthusians
1894-95
Old Carthusians
6
0
Casuals
1895-96
Old Carthusians
3
1
Casuals
1896-97
Old Carthusians
5
2
3rd Grenadier Guards
1897-98
Brentford
5
1
Ilford
1898-99
Old Carthusians
2
1
London Caledonians
  99-00
London Caledonians
1
0
Old Westminsters
1900-01
Ilford
2
1
Clapton
1901-02
Civil Service
3
2
Shepherds Bush
1902-03
Old Malvernians
4
2
Clapton
1903-04
Leyton
1
0
Ilford
1904-05
Ilford
2
1
Ealing
1905-06
New Crusaders
2
2
Dulwich Hamlet


3
1

1906-07
West Norwood
4
1
West Hampstead
1907-08
London Caledonians
1
0
Dulwich Hamlet
1908-09
Clapton
1
0
Nunhead
1909-10
Bromley
1
0
Clapton
1910-11
Clapton
2
0
Ilford
1911-12
Barking
3
0
London Caledonians
1912-13
Tufnell Park
2
0
Metrogas
1913-14
Ilford
1
1
Nunhead


2
0

1914-15
London Caledonians
4
1
Clapton





1919-20
Leytonstone
5
2
Barking Town
1920-21
Barking Town
4
1
Dulwich Hamlet
1921-22
Ilford
3
1
Nunhead
1922-23
Nunhead
1
0
Bromley
1923-24
Tufnell Park
2
1
Kingstonian
1924-25
Dulwich Hamlet
2
0
Clapton
1925-26
London Caledonians
3
1
Kingstonian
1926-27
Barking Town
4
2
London Caledonians
1927-28
London Caledonians
2
0
Dulwich Hamlet
1928-29
Ilford
4
1
London Caledonians
1929-30
Ilford
4
1
Walthamstow Avenue
1930-31
Wimbledon
1
0
Kingstonian
1931-32
Hayes
3
1
Ilford
1932-33
Finchley
2
0
Barnet
1933-34
Wimbledon
1
1
Leyton


2
1

1934-35
Enfield
2
0
Metropolitan Police
1935-36
Walthamstow Avenue
1
0
Golders Green
1936-37
Walthamstow Avenue
6
3
Hayes